Dog owners have been put on notice after the “horrific” death of two rescued wombats this week and a spike in attacks.
Dog owners have been put on notice after the “horrific” death of two rescued wombats this week and a spike in attacks.

Dogs blamed for attacks that ripped rescue animals to shreds

A SPIKE in dog attacks on wildlife in the state's southeast has prompted animal carers and a local council to remind owners to keep their animals contained.

The Tasman Council is investigating several instances of wombats being seriously injured or killed by dogs in the Koonya and White Beach areas.

Roaring Beach Wildlife Rescue president Ange Anderson said another long term local wildlife rescuer on the Tasman Peninsula had two of her wombats killed by a dog on Tuesday night.

Baby wombat rescued from its dead mums pouch at Port Arthur now on the road to recovery. Picture: Ange Anderson
Baby wombat rescued from its dead mums pouch at Port Arthur now on the road to recovery. Picture: Ange Anderson

"She has quite extensive outdoor facilities that she spent a lot of time putting in to keep her wombats safe and sadly two wombats she'd been rearing for over a year were both killed by a dog that got into the pen during the night and ripped them to shreds," she said.

"Recently on the peninsula we've have had a few attacks on wildlife from dogs, but this was the first time they've got into an enclosure. Another wombat has been released by another carer and another one was found on the road with its ears ripped off and the back of its neck torn out, which was pretty horrific. It had to be euthanised."

Ms Anderson said the rescue facility was working with the council to track down the owners of the dogs.

The Dog Control Act was recently amended to allow councils to take compliance action in relation to attacks on native wildlife.

Baby wombat rescued from its dead mums pouch at Port Arthur now on the road to recovery. Picture: Ange Anderson
Baby wombat rescued from its dead mums pouch at Port Arthur now on the road to recovery. Picture: Ange Anderson

"Your dog will be seized and impounded if council believe your dog is responsible for attacks on native wildlife," a Tasman Council spokesperson said.

"It is the responsible of dog owners to ensure their dogs are adequately contained within their property, and they don't create a nuisance by chasing livestock or native animals.

"Substantial financial penalties will apply if dogs are found to be at large."

Ms Anderson said on a positive note, a baby wombat rescued in May was starting to venture out of her makeshift pouch.

"Her mother was run over in Port Arthur when she was only 250 grams and found by a member of the public who walks along there every morning and picks up all the roadkill," she said.

jessica.howard@news.com.au

Originally published as Dogs blamed for attacks that ripped rescue animals to shreds


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