Extremely disturbing images of starving, deformed and tick ridden dogs have prompted calls for something to be done to fix the situation.
Extremely disturbing images of starving, deformed and tick ridden dogs have prompted calls for something to be done to fix the situation.

Dying ‘bush dogs’ left to rot prompts calls for swift action

DISTURBING images of starving, deformed, tick ridden and bleeding dogs rescued from small and remote communities in Far North Queensland has a local animal welfare advocate calling for something to be done.

For four years Lyn Dadd has worked eight hours a day rescuing, rehabilitating and rehoming mistreated dogs and pups.

This animal was rescued from Yarrabah in September.
This animal was rescued from Yarrabah in September.

With community help, Ms Dadd visits small and remote communities to find 'bush dogs' in need of help.

Usually dogs are fed, treated and returned to their owners where possible.

But handing back dying dogs after recent spate in horrendous cruelty had Ms Dadd at the end of her tether.

"Come on something has got to give. Handing those dying pups back has broken my heart," she said.

"It takes a toll on my health and heart, it just doesn't stop day in, day out."

This rescued dog is suffering from malnutrition and severe skin condition.
This rescued dog is suffering from malnutrition and severe skin condition.

Ms Dadd, through her Facebook page FNQ Bush Dogs and Pups, is calling on authorities to step in and address the ongoing mistreatment of animals.

RSPCA Queensland's Michael Beatty said in many remote communities social factors meant the welfare of animals was simply not prioritised.

"(People) have got their own problems. Sometimes there's alcohol and drug issues," he said.

"In lower socio-economic areas we tend to have more animal issues than we do in other areas."

A blind dog rescued by Lyn Dadd of FNQ Bush Dogs and Pups.
A blind dog rescued by Lyn Dadd of FNQ Bush Dogs and Pups.

Mr Beatty said the not-for-profit organisation employed 22 animal inspectors across the state and simply didn't have the resources to be effective in the more remote areas of the Far North.

"If we get complaint in some of those remote areas we pass them on to (the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries) or the police," he said.

But, Mr Beatty said other authorities couldn't always get involved.

"In an ideal world if we had inspectors everywhere, you would certainly help a lot more than what we are at the moment," he said.

Rather than 'big stick' deterrent-based change Mr Beatty said education and desexing programs were be the best way to tackle the problem.

"We would like to see some funds put in so we can run regular desexing opportunities in some of those communities," he said.

"I'm not sure (harsher penalties) are the answer," he said.


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