Did you blow Kevin Rudd's stimulus payment on junk? Here's how to avoid doing the same thing with Scott Morrison's cash handout and earn some serious bank.

Exclusive: The Federal Government's much-celebrated tax cuts could be putting refunds of up to $1080 in Australian taxpayers' bank accounts as soon as Friday.

But while the Coalition hopes consumers will go out and splash the cash in an attempt to reinvigorate the sluggish economy, they might be better off holding their dollars close.

New superannuation investment data collated by Envision Financial for News Corp Australia has found consumers could earn more than $70,000 just by saving either $20, $50 or $100 a week from their forthcoming tax refund.

This is not the best way of spending your money if you want to have more of it.
This is not the best way of spending your money if you want to have more of it.

While many maybe tempted to just splurge on the luxury item they haven't been able to afford, Specialist adviser and Director of Envision Financial Luke Smith told News Corp the data shows how Australians could make more money from their tax refunds.

The tax cuts give those with a taxable income of up to $37,000 relief of up to $255, while others earning between $37,001 and $47,999 will receive $255 to $1080 extra back.

Workers paid between $48,000 and $90,000 get the full $1080 cut, which gradually reduces to zero for those earning between $90,001 and $126,000.

Mr Smith analysed the scenarios of a $255, $855, and $1080 tax cut if consumers were to save just $20, $50 or $100 a week.

SEE YOUR MONEY GROW TO $70,000+

See how these amounts could grow your nest egg below:

The financial planner said if a 25-year-old added $1080 to their super account straight away, they could see it balloon to $23,400 if it was invested at an average of 8 per cent over 40 years until they turn age 65.

And given the same conditions, $855 could climb to $18,500.

"Not bad for money you were not expecting," he said.

"Over 30 years its $8,600 so time has a lot of value."

Mr Smith added a voluntary super contribution would also deliver tax concessions.

"$1080 should provide a tax saving of approximately $205 assuming a marginal tax rate of 34 per cent" he said.

Envision Financial specialist adviser Luke Smith said Aussies should consider adding their refund to their superannuation. But there are other ways to save and pay down debt. Picture: Supplied
Envision Financial specialist adviser Luke Smith said Aussies should consider adding their refund to their superannuation. But there are other ways to save and pay down debt. Picture: Supplied

SAVE CASH WITHOUT EVEN THINKING

But super may not be a priority for everyone, so for those just keen to save it and not spend it all at once. Mr Smith said they should consider putting the money into an account not liked to their online banking and set up a regular payment debit.

"What you can't see you don't access and what you direct to savings you don't miss each fortnight or month," he said.

"This can limit discretionary impulse purchases or aeroplane tickets to Coachella after to many drinks on a Friday night that destroys your savings account."

MAKE MORE WITH YOUR PROPERTY

For those with a home loan, depositing $855 or $1080 in an offset account could also bring benefits.

"This would reduce interest costs incurred, and then you could use the money in June each year for a tax deductible contribution to super. This would let you double dip with the same money," he said.

Property owners could also use the refund for improvements around a rental property to keep tenants happy.

"Costs are generally [tax] deductible and a happy tenant is a long term tenant," he said.

Property can be a great way to make a decent investment with your tax refund. Picture: istock
Property can be a great way to make a decent investment with your tax refund. Picture: istock

TRY YOUR HAND AT AN ETF, JUST LIKE A STOCK

Savvy Aussies might also want to consider an Exchange Traded Fund (EFT) to grow their money, Mr Smith explained, which they could buy into with as little as $500.

An EFT is a basket of securities that tracks an index or a sector and is usually done at a low cost.

"Depending on the exposure the rate of return could be a lot more than cash or term deposits," he said.

Mr Smith said if a 25-year-old added $1080 to their super account, they could see it balloon to $23,400 if it was invested at an average of 8 per cent over 40 years. Picture: Supplied
Mr Smith said if a 25-year-old added $1080 to their super account, they could see it balloon to $23,400 if it was invested at an average of 8 per cent over 40 years. Picture: Supplied

USE IT TO HELP YOUR KIDS SAVE

Mr Smith added families could use the $855 or $1080 to kickstart a savings plan for their children. They could continue to grow this by adding a portion of their pocket money or part-time work earnings each week.

"With a starting value with of $855, adding $40 per month contribution from ages 10-18 could be valued at $5,500 at a rate of 4 per cent," he said.

"Not only will it cover the ticket overseas for a gap year but it may also teach them regular savings behaviour, the value of compound interest and also investment options as the value grows."

Families could use the $855 or $1080 tax refunds to kickstart a savings plan for children. Picture: Thinkstock
Families could use the $855 or $1080 tax refunds to kickstart a savings plan for children. Picture: Thinkstock

SWITCH TO PRE-PAID PLANS

He said across all tax refund brackets, Aussies would do well to consider prepaying fixed costs such as mobile phone plans, utility bills or rates.

"It takes the pain out of a monthly or quarterly bill," he said.

"Then set up a direct debit for a smaller amount more often as that is normally easier to manage cashflow wise rather than finding the entire bill."

SEE HOW MUCH YOU'RE OWED HERE IN OUR CALCULATOR

PAY DOWN INTEREST-FREE BUYS

Mr Smith added consumers should also consider paying down interest-free purchases.

"Interest free is great if used correctly … so the items you already have could cost you a lot less if you use the tax refund to get in front of the minimum payment," he said.

"$855 would pay off 17 per cent of a $5000 purchase."

He said impulse purchases could also be avoided by depositing the money in a savings account not linked to online banking.

Australian Retailers Association executive director Russell Zimmerman hoped consumers would spend their extra cash in stores. Picture: AAP
Australian Retailers Association executive director Russell Zimmerman hoped consumers would spend their extra cash in stores. Picture: AAP

RETAILERS CAN'T WAIT

Meanwhile, retailers are champing at the bit for long-awaited relief as the tax cuts put extra cash in Australians' pockets within days.

Australian Retailers Association executive director Russell Zimmerman says his sector has "done it very tough" over the last few years.

But he believes tax cuts that cleared federal parliament last week, giving low and middle-income earners an extra $1000 when they file their 2018/19 tax returns, are "great news".

So too are recent cuts to the official interest rate that give mortgage holders a little more cash to splash, he says.

"We're looking forward to the consumers actually spending their tax cuts," Mr Zimmerman said.

- with AAP


Regional arts fund renewed for another round in the bush

Regional arts fund renewed for another round in the bush

Local councils have been given thousands for the arts.

Grand re-opening a huge boost for Morven

Grand re-opening a huge boost for Morven

Local supermarket opens for the first time in two-and-a-half years.

Young boy struck on highway utters his first words

Young boy struck on highway utters his first words

Jaxon is on the road to recovery after horrific highway accident.