Young disabled woman in wheelchair at home, rear view.
Young disabled woman in wheelchair at home, rear view.

Queenslanders die waiting for NDIS assistance

MORE than 1200 Australians have died while waiting for an NDIS package in just three years - tragically including 65 children and an average of almost two Queenslanders a week.

Thirty-five of the children were aged six and younger.

The shocking number of deaths occurred as families waited four months on average for National Disability Insurance Scheme support last year.

New figures show 270 Queenslanders were among the 1279 people who died waiting for support from July 2016 to September 2019.

Wait times in Queensland were shorter than the national average, but were still an average of three months or 90 days for children under six, and four months or 122 days for those aged seven and older in 2018-19.

New figures show 170 South Australians were among the 1279 people who died waiting for supports from July 2016 to September 2019.

They also reveal SA has the longest wait times in the country.

SA families waited more than 210 days on average to receive supports.

That's significantly longer than the national average, which is 121 days for children with a disability aged six and under and five months or 152 days for those aged seven and older.

For young SA children, it was a seven-month wait or 214 days on average, and for those aged seven and older it was more than an eight-month wait or 249 days.

 

Beverley Rubenach is the mother of Tim Rubenach, who died in May 2018 aged 32 of pneumonia while still on the wait list for help from the NDIS. Picture: Wolfgang Glowacki
Beverley Rubenach is the mother of Tim Rubenach, who died in May 2018 aged 32 of pneumonia while still on the wait list for help from the NDIS. Picture: Wolfgang Glowacki

Beverley Rubenach, whose son Tim suffered severe epilepsy and died from pneumonia while waiting for a special medical bed and a motorised wheelchair in 2018, said she was "horrified" so many families had been through the same pain.

"Our hope when Tim passed away [was] that things would change," Ms Rubenach said.

"We've got documents after documents, letters and letters where we pleaded with the government," she said.

Ms Rubenach felt authorities managing the scheme were "absolutely heartless" and said it seemed like so many people got lost in the system.

The Courier-Mail put ­questions to Minister for the NDIS Stuart Robert and the ­National Disability Insurance Agency on Monday about the wait times and number of Australians who had died waiting for support. Mr Robert, the Member for Fadden in south-east Queensland, did not respond.

An NDIA spokeswoman said that the wellbeing of participants was "of the highest priority to the NDIA" and it was committed to improving the timeliness for access and plan approvals.

She said decisions around NDIS access were taking four 4days on average as of December 31, while it was taking 77 days for a first plan to be approved.

"Like all Australians, NDIS participants continue to be supported through the health system irrespective of their eligibility for the NDIS," she said.

The Morrison Government will set new time-frames for NDIS decision-making in law this year, including a deadline of 50 days for children aged six and under to have plans approved. It's part of an election promise for an NDIS "Participant Service Guarantee", due to be rolled out from July 1.

People with Disability Australia chief executive Jeff Smith said that the wait times were "unacceptable", but "not surprising".

"For a long time, we've had significant delays in the system. It's an issue we've been raising since the NDIS started," he said.

The NDIA needed more staff and further training to tackle the delays, which were "across the board" in NDIS plan approvals, finalisation and reviews if they weren't working, Mr Smith said.

More assistance help was also needed to help help people with disability access the "bureaucratically complicated" system, he said.

Labor's NDIS spokesman Bill Shorten said it was "disgraceful" that more than 1200 people had died before receiving the equipment or care they needed.

"There needs to be more staff and more accountability," he said, adding that tTime-frames for decisions were crucial, he said.


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