A “highly narcissistic” killer who murdered a 17-year-old to take revenge on the teenager’s sister has quietly been released from prison.
A “highly narcissistic” killer who murdered a 17-year-old to take revenge on the teenager’s sister has quietly been released from prison.

Released killer ‘needs to be watched carefully’

A "HIGHLY narcissistic" killer who stabbed one man in the back in a jealous rage and murdered a teenager to take revenge on the youth's sister has quietly been released from prison after applying for parole five times.

Damon Frank Calanca murdered 17-year-old Gabe Meyer in 1993 in the hope it would force the return of his former girlfriend - Gabe's sister - from overseas.

Gabe was poisoned, suffocated and buried in a shallow grave by an evil and jealous Calanca, who was freed from prison three months ago to live in southeast Queensland.

Gabriel Meyer was poisoned and suffocated by Calanca in Innisfail.
Gabriel Meyer was poisoned and suffocated by Calanca in Innisfail.

 

Both of Calanca's attacks happened when a girl he'd been dating tried to break it off.

Gabe's mother Sherrie, who would go on to establish the Queensland Homicide Victims' Support Group, said she was "extremely disappointed" at the release of her son's killer.

Calanca was given just 13 years non-parole and has been fighting for his release for more than a decade.

"We really struggled when it (his release) was happening," Mrs Meyer said.

"When we were told, we were really shaken up about it.

"We hope that he is watched very carefully."

Mrs Meyer established QHVSG - which just celebrated its 25th anniversary - after struggling to find someone to turn to after her son's murder.

More than two decades after Gabe, 17, was killed, Sherrie and husband Doug have stood alongside many other families who have suffered the same horror of losing a loved one to homicide.

 

Gabriel Meyer's father Doug sister Fawn and mother Sherrie.
Gabriel Meyer's father Doug sister Fawn and mother Sherrie.

 

QHVSG began with only a handful of families sitting around a table in Townsville talking about their losses.

It has grown to 8000 supported members.

"When it happened, along with the trauma of the murder, it was just so hard because there were no services for families," Mrs Meyer said.

"The police were amazing but it wasn't their job (to be there for us) and we felt really alone."

Mrs Meyer said the grief of losing a loved one to homicide is a "lifelong journey" but families should take heart they can live a productive life.

She offered advice to those who don't know what to say to a person who has lost someone.

"Keep talking about it," she said.

"Use the person that has died's name, don't pretend it didn't happen because it's so scary and it's so traumatic."


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