Cocooning is the latest on-point COVID trend
Cocooning is the latest on-point COVID trend

Why cocooning is the latest on-point COVID trend

Cocooning has pushed aside panic buying and working from home as the latest on-point COVID trend, as Aussies bunker down from the troubles of the outside world.

Major retailers such as Ikea, Temple & Webster, Domayne and Brosa have been overwhelmed by skyrocketing demand for sofas, lounges, rugs and soft furnishings - which has exploded by as much as 180 per cent year-on-year.

The rush for home furnishings is so great it is clogging up our ports as importers battle to match supply with demand.

"Cocooning has always existed, but it's never been as widely embraced as it has in the past year," Selma Rajah, from Temple & Webster said.

"Australians are relishing their personal spaces more than ever, and actively seeking to make them more comfortable, more functional and more beautiful."

Carlea Elmes bunkers down in her Dunbar Terrace home. Picture: Nick Clayton.
Carlea Elmes bunkers down in her Dunbar Terrace home. Picture: Nick Clayton.

Coined in 1981 by trend forecaster Faith Popcorn, the term "cocooning" is the act of bunkering down at home to avoid the perceived dangers of the outside world. It has taken on a whole new meaning in this pandemic age.

Retail giant Ikea has witnessed a 40 per cent year on year sales spike of sofas and chaises, with rugs and runners up 37 per cent over the same period.

Booming furniture and homewares online retailer Brosa has enjoyed incredible sales growth of 180 per cent across the board on this time last year.

"People are valuing their time spent at home," said Rushabh Sanghavi, chief commercial officer at Brosa.

"It has redefined the way we live - and shop."

Comforting fabrics, soothing colour schemes, deep sofas and ambient lighting are all crucial components of the cocooning vibe. It's also about getting more from our real estate as we transform living rooms into high-tech home theatres and create wellness spaces in our spare rooms to help fill the void when we can't go out.

Carlea Elmes with her dogs, Alfie (left) and Barkley. Picture: Nick Clayton.
Carlea Elmes with her dogs, Alfie (left) and Barkley. Picture: Nick Clayton.

"As more people congregate at home, there's been a real need for the creation of designated zones for individual activities like working, learning, playing and relaxing," Ms Rajah said.

Domayne is another major retailer reporting a surge in overall sales volumes, particularly evident in home furnishings, comfy sofas and decorator items.

"During COVID there has been an increase in people shopping for home items, as they are not travelling or going out and socialising as much. They are spending more time at home and updating the look and feel of their home comforts." Fiona Tedesco, General Manager of Domayne Bedding and Manchester, said.

Carlea Elmes has become a cocooning devotee in her "elegant and moody" space.

"I love to sit at home on cold nights with a movie playing and a glass of red," she said.

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Originally published as Why cocooning is the latest on-point COVID trend


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